?

Log in

No account? Create an account
FF Sparks (Casual)

[Book] Alosha

Last night, I read a book in a single sitting. Short book, and probably more classified as Young Adult than anything else; Alosha, by Christopher Pike, the first of a series. It wasn't hugely deep, it wasn't epic, but it was oddly enjoyable.

It had that sort of pleasant innocence to it that I haven't read in a long while. There's conflict and struggle, but also a sort of innocent wonder at things instead of the deep, tearing angst I've seen in many fantasy novels of late. shadowfey, I think you'd also enjoy this, considering how faerie was worked into it. ;)

So if you're looking for a pleasant light fantasy read, I actually recommend this one.

Comments

"deep, tearing angst"

I think these three words describe the 2nd Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever for me. (That, and "loaded with characters who you want to stab with sporks until they bleed candy after a while.")

Christopher Pike I've heard of, but never read. After I get off my Jack Vance kick, maybe I'll track some of his stuff down.
As a follow-up, I'm reading In the Country of the Blind, by Michael Flynn. I read it years ago, but didn't remember most of the details.

After that, I'm tackling the Big Honkin' Book I got, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke. It's been described as having stylistic elements reminiscent of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens, but it is urban fantasy set in the early 1800's. It's immense, and the reviews I've read are all either glowing, or pan it entirely. The glowing reviews are from folks who really love classical literature and fantasy both, the pans seem to be mostly from folks who like just fantasy.

I'm looking forward to it, really... it should be interesting.
On a more surreal note, I found this (Michael Flynn didn't ring any bells*. But a google search led me to it):

http://www.baen.com/chapters/W200206/074343529X.htm?blurb

Erasmus Darwin. Fighting crime and solving mysteries, looks like.

(Why not?)




* I may as well admit that I'm generally unable to hold my own in a conversation regarding fiction. Unless it's from, like, pre-1970, or so, with a few exceptions.
Ah, Charles Sheffield. Good writer, but occasionally very strange. :)

As for pre-1970 fiction, I will admit that I somewhere still have really REALLY old André Norton stuff (the Zero Stone saga, the Gryphon in Glory stuff), and that I still treasure my collection of James Blish's 'Cities in Flight' books.

My father and I have a shared bookshelf back at my parents' house, which is our 'timeless SF classics' collection. C.J. Cherryh's 'Faded Sun' books, Downbelow Station, the Foundation books, really old Arthur C. Clarke stuff, Zelazny, James P. Hogan's Inherit the Stars, a dog-eared and much-beloved copy of Leigh Brackett's Sword of Rhiannon, etc. And on up to more recent things, like Joan D. Vinge's Psion and Catspaw, etc.

(peers)

Luggage fell on you? And you forgot?

More relevantly, I used to read Christopher Pike when I was a kid. He wrote some pretty angsty YA horror stuff. One I remember was The Witch, where at the end the MC let herself die astrally so her friend could come back to life. Another was The Dress (or something like that) where this dress granted wishes but the cost was huge -- like this poor girl who found the dress on a bus but didn't report it had a statue fall on her head and gave her total amnesia, when the only thing she had going for her was her trivia team membership. So it took her knowledge. :)

Very angsty.
Luggage fell on you? And you forgot?

Not... forgot. I just thought it was a bruise, and it was two and a half months ago, so when my shoulder started to really honest-to-god hurt a LOT, I didn't connect someone dropping a suitcase from the overhead bin onto me two and a half months ago with present shoulder pain.

I /do/ actually remember Witch. This book, though, was much less angsty. Really, most of his other stuff is classified as YA Horror, not YA Fantasy.
Check out 'Drawing of the Dark' by Tim Powers for some good historical fantasy that's fairly angst-neutral. It's got some dark and some light and a little bit of grit. Also check out 'The Anubis Gates' for a lot more grit, a little more dark, and early-19th-century urban adventure.
I'll second that. I'm also told Expiration Date is really good, but it, like Eon, suffers from takes-too-long-to-get-started-for-Scott's-taste Syndrome, so I never finished it.
You read some nifty sounding stuff. Any way I could pursuade you to make a link to your LJ of the stuff you read and/or recommend so I can pillage titles and enjoy as well? :p